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Our Researcher's Publications

The work that Battelle researchers have published is a direct reflection of their expertise, innovative thinking and reputation. Many journals have restrictions on repurposing their content and oftentimes require a subscription. The below listing is a subset of our researcher's total publications and some of the links may require a subscription.

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David A Friedenberg's Publications

  • A High Definition Noninvasive Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation System for Cortical Control of Combinatorial Rotary Hand Movements in a Human With Tetraplegia

    IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering · 10.1109/TBME.2018.2864104 · 2019

    Authors: Nicholas V. Annetta, J Friend, A Schimmoeller, VS Buck, David Friedenberg, Chad E. Bouton, Marcia A. Bockbrader, Patrick Ganzer, Sam Colachis, Mingming Zhang, Walter J. Mysiw, Ali R. Rezai, Gaurav Sharma
    Paralysis resulting from spinal cord injury (SCI) can have a devastating effect on multiple arm and hand motor functions. Rotary hand movements, such as supination and pronation, are commonly impaired by upper extremity paralysis, and are essential for many activities of daily living. In this proof-of-concept study, we utilize a neural bypass system (NBS) to decode motor intention from motor cortex to control combinatorial rotary hand movements elicited through stimulation of the arm muscles, effectively bypassing the SCI of the study participant. We describe the NBS system architecture and design that enabled this functionality. Methods: The NBS consists of three main functional components: 1) implanted intracortical microelectrode array, 2) neural data processing using a computer, and, 3) a noninvasive neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) system. Results: We address previous limitations of the NBS, and confirm the enhanced capability of the NBS to enable, in real-time, combinatorial hand rotary motor functions during a functionally relevant object manipulation task. Conclusion: This enhanced capability was enabled by accurate decoding of multiple movement intentions from the participant's motor cortex, interleaving NMES patterns to combine hand movements, and dynamically switching between NMES patterns to adjust for hand position changes during movement. Significance: These results have implications for enabling complex rotary hand functions in sequence with other functionally relevant movements for patients suffering from SCI, stroke, and other sensorimotor dysfunctions.
  • A High Definition Non-invasive Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation System for Cortical Control of Combinatorial Rotary Hand Movements in a Human with Tetraplegia

    IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering · DOI: 10.1109/TBME.2018.2864104 · 2018

    Authors: Nicholas V. Annetta, J Friend, A Schimmoeller, VS Buck, David Friedenberg, Chad E. Bouton, Marcia A. Bockbrader, Patrick Ganzer, Sam Colachis, Mingming Zhang, Walter J. Mysiw, Ali R. Rezai, Gaurav Sharma
  • Meeting brain-computer interface user performance expectations using a deep neural network decoding framework

    Nature Medicine · 24, pages 1669–1676 · 2018

    Authors: David Friedenberg, Nick Skomrock, Per B. Sederberg, Jordyn E. Ting, Gaurav Sharma, Marcia A. Bockbrader
  • Dexterous Control of Seven Functional Hand Movements Using Cortically-Controlled Transcutaneous Muscle Stimulation in a Person With Tetraplegia

    Frontiers in Neuroscience · DOI: 10.3389/fnins.2018.00208 · 2018

    Authors: Sam Colachis, Marcia A. Bockbrader, Mingming Zhang, David Friedenberg, Nicholas V. Annetta, Nick Skomrock, Walter J. Mysiw, Ali R. Rezai, Herbert S. Bresler, Gaurav Sharma
    Individuals with tetraplegia identify restoration of hand function as a critical, unmet need to regain their independence and improve quality of life. Brain-Computer Interface (BCI)-controlled Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) technology addresses this need by reconnecting the brain with paralyzed limbs to restore function. In this study, we quantified performance of an intuitive, cortically-controlled, transcutaneous FES system on standardized object manipulation tasks from the Grasp and Release Test (GRT). We found that a tetraplegic individual could use the system to control up to seven functional hand movements, each with 95% individual accuracy. He was able to select one movement from the possible seven movements available to him and use it to appropriately manipulate all GRT objects in real-time using naturalistic grasps. With the use of the system, the participant not only improved his GRT performance over his baseline, demonstrating an increase in number of transfers for all objects except the Block, but also significantly improved transfer times for the heaviest objects (videocassette and Can). Analysis of underlying motor cortex neural representations associated with the hand grasp states revealed an overlap or non-separability in neural activation patterns for similarly shaped objects that affected BCI-FES performance. These results suggest that motor cortex neural representations for functional grips are likely more related to hand shape and force required to hold objects, rather than to the objects themselves. These results, demonstrating multiple, naturalistic functional hand movements with the BCI-FES, constitute a further step toward translating BCI-FES technologies from research devices to clinical neuroprosthetics.

    Abstract reproduced under Creative Commons License.
  • Neuroprosthetic-enabled control of graded arm muscle contraction in a paralyzed human

    Scientific Reports · 7, Article number: 8386 · 2017

    Authors: David Friedenberg, Andrew J. Landgraf, Nicholas V. Annetta, Marcia A. Bockbrader, Chad E. Bouton, Mingming Zhang, Ali R. Rezai, Walter J. Mysiw, Herbert S. Bresler, Gaurav Sharma
    Neuroprosthetics that combine a brain computer interface (BCI) with functional electrical stimulation (FES) can restore voluntary control of a patients’ own paralyzed limbs. To date, human studies have demonstrated an “all-or-none” type of control for a fixed number of pre-determined states, like hand-open and hand-closed. To be practical for everyday use, a BCI-FES system should enable smooth control of limb movements through a continuum of states and generate situationally appropriate, graded muscle contractions. Crucially, this functionality will allow users of BCI-FES neuroprosthetics to manipulate objects of different sizes and weights without dropping or crushing them. In this study, we present the first evidence that using a BCI-FES system, a human with tetraplegia can regain volitional, graded control of muscle contraction in his paralyzed limb. In addition, we show the critical ability of the system to generalize beyond training states and accurately generate wrist flexion states that are intermediate to training levels. These innovations provide the groundwork for enabling enhanced and more natural fine motor control of paralyzed limbs by BCI-FES neuroprosthetics.

    Abstract reproduced under Creative Commons license.
  • Using an Artificial Neural Bypass to Restore Cortical Control of Rhythmic Movements in a Human with Quadriplegia

    Scientific Reports · 6, Article number: 33807 · 2016

    Authors: Gaurav Sharma, David Friedenberg, Nicholas V. Annetta, Bradley Glenn, Marcia A. Bockbrader, Conner Majstorovic, Stephanie Domas, Walter J. Mysiw, Ali R. Rezai, Chad E. Bouton
    Neuroprosthetic technology has been used to restore cortical control of discrete (non-rhythmic) hand movements in a paralyzed person. However, cortical control of rhythmic movements which originate in the brain but are coordinated by Central Pattern Generator (CPG) neural networks in the spinal cord has not been demonstrated previously. Here we show a demonstration of an artificial neural bypass technology that decodes cortical activity and emulates spinal cord CPG function allowing volitional rhythmic hand movement. The technology uses a combination of signals recorded from the brain, machine-learning algorithms to decode the signals, a numerical model of CPG network, and a neuromuscular electrical stimulation system to evoke rhythmic movements. Using the neural bypass, a quadriplegic participant was able to initiate, sustain, and switch between rhythmic and discrete finger movements, using his thoughts alone. These results have implications in advancing neuroprosthetic technology to restore complex movements in people living with paralysis.

    Abstract reproduced under Creative Commons license.
  • Restoring cortical control of functional movement in a human with quadriplegia

    Nature · 533, pages 247–250 · 2016

    Authors: Chad E. Bouton, Ammar Shaikhouni, Nicholas V. Annetta, Marcia A. Bockbrader, David Friedenberg, Dylan M. Nielson, Gaurav Sharma, Per B. Sederberg, Bradley Glenn, Walter J. Mysiw, Austin G. Morgan, Milind Deogaonkar, Ali R. Rezai
  • Big data challenges in decoding cortical activity in a human with quadriplegia to inform a brain computer interface

    IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society · Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the EMBS · 2016

    Authors: David Friedenberg, Chad E. Bouton, Nicholas V. Annetta, Nick Skomrock, Mingming Zhang, Marcia A. Bockbrader, Walter J. Mysiw, Ali R. Rezai, Herbert S. Bresler, Gaurav Sharma